......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
pace_1.jpg
 Rob Ball’s photos of pacemakers and guns isolate traces of death and the dead with unadorned matter-of-factness. The pacemaker photographs, individually titled using their unique serial numbers, evoke associations with imprisonment and the systematic tagging of Jews during the Second World War. The former carriers of the pacemakers are implied, but only through their absence, unified by their fragility and without any real impression of individuality. In doing so these images convey how long-term illness confines and, to an extent, impounds sufferers.  Hugh Dichmont, Artist Newsletter

Rob Ball’s photos of pacemakers and guns isolate traces of death and the dead with unadorned matter-of-factness. The pacemaker photographs, individually titled using their unique serial numbers, evoke associations with imprisonment and the systematic tagging of Jews during the Second World War. The former carriers of the pacemakers are implied, but only through their absence, unified by their fragility and without any real impression of individuality. In doing so these images convey how long-term illness confines and, to an extent, impounds sufferers.

Hugh Dichmont, Artist Newsletter

jpg.jpeg
pace_3.jpg
pace_4.jpg
pace_5.jpg
pace_6.jpg

Rob Ball’s photos of pacemakers and guns isolate traces of death and the dead with unadorned matter-of-factness. The pacemaker photographs, individually titled using their unique serial numbers, evoke associations with imprisonment and the systematic tagging of Jews during the Second World War. The former carriers of the pacemakers are implied, but only through their absence, unified by their fragility and without any real impression of individuality. In doing so these images convey how long-term illness confines and, to an extent, impounds sufferers.

Hugh Dichmont, Artist Newsletter

pace_1.jpg
 Rob Ball’s photos of pacemakers and guns isolate traces of death and the dead with unadorned matter-of-factness. The pacemaker photographs, individually titled using their unique serial numbers, evoke associations with imprisonment and the systematic tagging of Jews during the Second World War. The former carriers of the pacemakers are implied, but only through their absence, unified by their fragility and without any real impression of individuality. In doing so these images convey how long-term illness confines and, to an extent, impounds sufferers.  Hugh Dichmont, Artist Newsletter
jpg.jpeg
pace_3.jpg
pace_4.jpg
pace_5.jpg
pace_6.jpg